Legislative Tracker 1/27/17

Currently following 8 pieces of legislation.
HB39 GOVERNMENTAL LIQUOR LICENSE LEASING  Montoya, Rodney
Position:     Priority:

HPREF [1] HSIVC/HBIC­HSIVC  Scheduled:1/31/2017   Link to bill on nmlegis.gov    Synopsis
House Bill 39 (HB 39) provides that governmental licenses may be leased at certain facilities and for use in certain areas  that are designated by a governmental entity.   Analysis
House Bill 39 (HB 39) amends Section 60­6A­10 NMSA 1978 by allowing a governmental entity or its lessee to sell alcohol  at a qualifying facility.  It makes changes throughout this section to reflect this expansion of such sales to qualifying  facilities. HB 39 defines qualifying facility depending on population. For a municipality of less than twenty thousand  persons, it is a business at which alcoholic beverages may be legally served and consumed. If the municipality contains  twenty to fifty thousand people then it must meet the same criterion as above and be in an area designated as a  metropolitan redevelopment area or a main street project area under the respective code or act.    HB 39 would be effective 1 July 2017. HB51 RETAIL CRAFT LIQUOR RECIPROCITY  Garcia Richard, Stephanie
Position:     Priority:

HPREF [1] HCPAC/HBIC­HCPAC   Scheduled: Not Scheduled at this time.  Link to bill on nmlegis.gov     Synopsis
House Bill 51 (HB 51) amends the Liquor Control Act to create retail reciprocity among craft distillers, small brewers and  winegrowers.   Analysis
House Bill 51 (HB 51) amends Sections 60­6A­6.1, 60­6A­11 and 60­6A­26.1 NMSA 1978 to allow a craft distiller,  winegrower or small brewer respectively to sell the other two types of alcohol beverages as long as those beverages  comply with applicable state laws and no more than thirty percent of that distiller/grower/brewer’s gross receipts shall be  from the sale of the other two types of alcoholic beverages.    HB 51 allows for off­premise tastings and sales of the other two alcoholic beverages under the relevant amended sections  after all applicable laws and rules have been met and where applicable, the director has issued the relevant license.    It allows for sales of all three alcoholic beverages and tastings on winegrower’s premises between the hours of 12:00 noon  and midnight Sunday.    HB 51 would be effective 1 July 2017. HB58 RULEMAKING REQUIREMENTS
Gentry, Nate
Position:     Priority:

HPREF [1] HSIVC/HJC­HSIVC   Scheduled: Not Scheduled at this time.  Link to bill on nmlegis.gov     Synopsis
House Bill 58 (HB 58) creates requirements for proposing, adopting, amending, and repealing rules under the State Rules  Act.   Analysis
House Bill 58 (HB 58) amends Section 14­4­2 NMSA 1978, State Rules Act (Act), and creates requirements for taking  actions on rules. Political subdivisions are subject to the Act. New definitions include proceeding, proposed rule, and notice  to the public. Rulemaking information must be posted by various means including the agency’s website, New Mexico’s  Sunshine Portal, offices, and postal and electronic mail in response to written requests. The Legislative Council must also  be provided the information, so it can distribute to committees. Instead of the Record Center being responsible for  maintenance of rules, the State Records Administrator (Administrator) will receive and file copies in the office and on the  Records Center’s website. The Administrator may make minor, nonsubstantive corrections in filed rules. If changes are  made, they will be recorded and the corrected record must be sent to the filing agency within ten days.    HB 58 delineates rule adoption procedures by amending Section 14­4­5 NMSA 1978. Unless there is an emergency, rules  are not valid until published. There will be a public comment period.  There is a two­year limit to take action on a proposed  rule or it will be terminated. Extensions are allowed but the agency must allow public participation before adoption. After  notice to the public, rulemaking may be terminated by the agency. Within 15 days of adoption, the public must be notified  by the agency. The Administrator must publish rules as soon as practicable, but within 180 days. Rules and definitions are  not valid if they conflict with statutes or are resolved in favor of statutes. The Administrator may request an agency review  an agency rule if it appears to conflict with statutes. The agency has 30 days to review the rule.    A new section of the Act provides policy regarding notice of proposed rulemaking including summary of text, short purpose,  citations, how to obtain a copy of the full text, how to comment on the rule, when and where a public hearing will be held,  and technical information concerning the rule. The notice must contain an internet link providing free access to the full text.     Public participation, comments, and rule hearings procedures are added to the Act. This section includes notice of public  comment period at least 30 days in advance. Members of the public must be provided the opportunity to submit data,  views, or arguments. An agency representative or hearing officer will preside. The hearing will be open to the public and  recorded.     HB 58 enacts a new section of the Act, Agency Record in Rulemaking Proceeding that specifies agencies maintain records  that contain a copy of all publications, copies of technical information, official transcript of public hearing, material received  during public comment period, full texts of proposed and adopted versions of the rule, any corrections made by the  Administrator, and a concise explanatory statement by the agency. The statement must include the date the rule was  adopted, a reference to statute or authority authorizing the rule, findings required by a provision of the law, the agency’s  reasons for adopting the proposed rule, reasons the agency did not accept substantial arguments made in comments, and  reasons for substantive changes between proposed and adopted rule.    HB 58 provides that if there is an imminent peril to public welfare or the agency is in violation of federal law, a rule may be  adopted without a public hearing and with any abbreviated notice. The agency’s record includes a justification of the  emergency adoption and a statement that the rule is temporary. Emergency rules may take effect immediately after filing  with the Administrator and must be published in the New Mexico Register. Emergency rules will not permanently amend or  repeal existing rules. A permanent rule adhering to these procedures will supersede the emergency rule.     The Attorney General (AG) will adopt procedures no later than January 1, 2018 for public rule hearings if agencies have  not adopted procedures per Act. An agency that has adopted procedures must send a copy to the AG and post on  agency’s website.    HB 58 includes technical changes to language, updating proper names, and renumbering and relettering sections.     The effective date of the provisions of this Act is July 1, 2017.
HB111 TRADITIONAL HISTORIC COMMUNITY QUALIFICATIONS  Gonzales, Roberto
Position:     Priority:

HPREF [1] HLELC/HJC­HLELC  Scheduled:2/02/2017   Link to bill on nmlegis.gov    Synopsis
House Bill 111 (HB 111) relates to traditional historic communities. HB 111 amends Section 3­2­3. NMSA 1978 and Section  3­7­1.1. NMSA 1978. HB 111 revises qualifications related to the population size of a class A and class B county. HB 111 is  effective July 1, 2017.   Analysis
House Bill 111 (HB 111) amends Urbanized Territory­Incorporation Limited Within Urbanized Territory, Section 3­2­3. NMSA  1978. HB 111 also amends Traditional Historic Community­Qualifications­Annexation Restrictions, Section 3­7­1.1. NMSA  1978. HB 111 revises qualifications to qualify as a traditional historic community. HB 111 adds population size language to  the class A county section. HB 111 removes and replaces population language under the class B county section.   HB 111 amended language states that in order to qualify as a traditional historic community, an area must be an  unincorporated area of a class A county with a population between one hundred forty­thousand and two hundred  thousand, based on the most recent federal decennial Census; or a class B county with a population between thirtythousand and forty­thousand, based on the most recent federal decennial Census.     HB 101 removed language, between ninety­five thousand and ninety­nine thousand five hundred, from the class B county  section.    HB 111 amended language states that an urbanized territory is territory within the same county and within five miles of the  boundary of any municipality having a population of five­thousand or more persons within the same county, and within  three­miles of a municipality having a population of less than five­thousand persons; except territory in a class A county  with a population between one hundred forty­thousand and two hundred­thousand, based on the most recent federal  decennial Census or a class B county with a population between thirty­thousand and  forty­thousand, based on the most  recent federal decennial Census.     HB 111 removed language, between ninety­five thousand and ninety­nine thousand five hundred, from the class B county  section. HB111 TRADITIONAL HISTORIC COMMUNITY QUALIFICATIONS  Gonzales, Roberto
Position:     Priority:

HPREF [1] HLELC/HJC­HLELC  Scheduled:2/02/2017   Link to bill on nmlegis.gov    Synopsis
House Bill 111 (HB 111) relates to traditional historic communities. HB 111 amends Section 3­2­3. NMSA 1978 and Section  3­7­1.1. NMSA 1978. HB 111 revises qualifications related to the population size of a class A and class B county. HB 111 is  effective July 1, 2017.   Analysis
House Bill 111 (HB 111) amends Urbanized Territory­Incorporation Limited Within Urbanized Territory, Section 3­2­3. NMSA  1978. HB 111 also amends Traditional Historic Community­Qualifications­Annexation Restrictions, Section 3­7­1.1. NMSA  1978. HB 111 revises qualifications to qualify as a traditional historic community. HB 111 adds population size language to  the class A county section. HB 111 removes and replaces population language under the class B county section.   HB 111 amended language states that in order to qualify as a traditional historic community, an area must be an  unincorporated area of a class A county with a population between one hundred forty­thousand and two hundred  thousand, based on the most recent federal decennial Census; or a class B county with a population between thirty
thousand and forty­thousand, based on the most recent federal decennial Census.     HB 101 removed language, between ninety­five thousand and ninety­nine thousand five hundred, from the class B county  section.    HB 111 amended language states that an urbanized territory is territory within the same county and within five miles of the  boundary of any municipality having a population of five­thousand or more persons within the same county, and within  three­miles of a municipality having a population of less than five­thousand persons; except territory in a class A county  with a population between one hundred forty­thousand and two hundred­thousand, based on the most recent federal  decennial Census or a class B county with a population between thirty­thousand and  forty­thousand, based on the most  recent federal decennial Census.     HB 111 removed language, between ninety­five thousand and ninety­nine thousand five hundred, from the class B county  section. HB205 VACANT RURAL BUILDING ACT  Dow, Rebecca
Position:     Priority:

[3] HLELC/HJC­HLELC   Scheduled: Not Scheduled at this time.  Link to bill on nmlegis.gov     Synopsis
House Bill 205 (HB 205) enacts the Vacant Rural Building Act. It directs the adoption of a building code variance applicable  to the occupancy of a vacant commercial building by a small business that will reduce compliance costs, encourage rural  economic development, and protect public safety.  HB 205 provides powers and duties and prohibits a municipality from  enacting contrary ordinances.   Analysis
House Bill 205 (HB 205) creates the Vacant Rural Building Act (VRBA) for the purposes of encouraging and fostering  economic development in the state’s rural communities by providing incentives for small businesses to occupy vacant rural  buildings through the removal of building code requirements that do not affect building safety but are substantial financial  barriers to occupancy of such buildings by small businesses.    HB 205 provides a definition section for the following terms: commission, division, rural municipality, small business, and  vacant commercial building.    It directs the Division of Regulation and Licensing with the approval of the Construction Industries Commission to adopt  rules that will allow for variances that will support the purposes of the act and that will provide certification that a small  business’s new occupancy qualifies for these variances under the VRBA .  HB 205 requires the division in promulgating the  rules to consider standards and compliance requirements applicable to historic buildings pursuant to the 2015 New Mexico  Existing Building Code as a model for VRBA compliance requirements and building code compliance costs in these  situations. It does not allow the division to undermine its own duty to protect the life and property of the people in this state.      HB 205 amends Section 3­17­6 NMSA 1978 (Municipalities Ordinances) to prohibit any municipality including a home­rule  city from adopting ordinances that are inconsistent with the VRBA rules. HJM4 INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING INTERIM COMMITTEE  Ely, Daymon
Position:     Priority:

[2] HTRC   Scheduled: Not Scheduled at this time.  Link to bill on nmlegis.gov     Synopsis
House Joint Memorial 4 (HJM 4) relates to public infrastructure. HJM 4 requests the creation of an interim committee to  study the state’s public infrastructure funding systems for the purpose of identifying issues and proposing measures for  reform. HJM 4 relates to HB 2, HB 3, HB 5, HB 60, HB 77, HB 90, HB 94, HB 113, HB 140, SB 95, SB 110, and SB 112.   Analysis
House Joint Memorial 4 (HJM 4) calls for an interim committee of the legislature created to meet during the biennium of the  fifty­third legislature for the purpose of studying: 1) unspent infrastructure funds; 2) the process in public infrastructure  funding; and 3) to make recommendations on measures to improve the state’s public infrastructure process. HJM 3 calls  for lawmakers to study any issues related to the state’s public infrastructure funding systems; and identify measures to  improve those systems.      HJM 4 calls for the committee to be staffed by the Legislative Council Service with assistance from the Legislative Finance  Committee. HJM 4 calls for the committee to consist of members of the New Mexico Legislative Council and members of  the Legislative Finance Committee, with an understanding of the state’s fiscal policies.    HJM 4 relates to HB 2, HB 3, HB 5, HB 60, HB 77, HB 90, HB 94, HB 113, HB 140, SB 95, SB 110, and SB 112.
SB37 LIQUOR LICENSE FOR NM­DISTILLED SPIRITS  Soules, William
Position:     Priority:

SPREF [1] SRC/SCORC­SRC   Scheduled: Not Scheduled at this time.  Link to bill on nmlegis.gov     Synopsis
Senate Bill 37 (SB 37) provides that a local option district may hold an election to allow the sale by certain restaurant  licensees of spirituous liquors distilled and bottled in New Mexico.   Analysis
Senate Bill 37 (SB 37) amends Section 60­6A­4 NMSA 1978 to allow a local option district to add approval of restaurant  licenses for the sale of beer and wine and of spirituous liquors distilled and bottled in New Mexico.  It makes changes  throughout the section to reflect this new type of license.     It requires the local option district to limit the geographic locations of these licenses to enterprise zones, tax increment  development districts, an arts and cultural districts, main street or business improvement districts as defined by the  respective district or zone act; a frontier community or any other geographic location within a local option district that a  main street program coordinator or relevant local government has identified as a location in need of revitalization or  economic development improvements.    SB 37 requires an applicant for a license that includes distribution of spirituous liquors distilled and bottled in New Mexico  to submit evidence to the department that the applicant’s restaurant is located within the local option district’s designated  area, as required in Subsection B of this section.      SB 37 amends Section 60­6A­15 NMSA 1978 to set the license fee for a restaurant license for beer and wine only at one  thousand fifty dollars ($1,050); and for beer and wine and spirituous liquors distilled and bottled in New Mexico, at two  thousand dollars ($2,000).    SB 37 would be effective 1 July 2017.

Categories: Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *